How To Germinate Michelia Champaca From Seeds



Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Imagine a sweet perfume wafting into your window from the garden. When you’re growing a Michelia champaca in your yard, the natural perfume of its yellow flowers will float over your entire neighborhood. This flower makes the most expensive perfume in the world, ‘Joy’. Though it is native to India, Michelia Champaca also known as Magnolia Champaca is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones 10a to 11. A member of the magnolia family, champaca readily crosses with other magnolias.

Michelia champaca, or fragrant champaca, grows naturally across southern Asia and is sometimes cultivated as an ornamental tree in mild coastal areas such as western California. Growing to 20 feet in height, Michelia champaca is a medium-sized tree with a spreading crown of leathery foliage and a warm-season display of intensely fragrant, cup-shaped flowers in shades of yellow and white. The plant can be propagated from both seed and cuttings, but both present some challenges, since the seeds have a low rate of viability, and cuttings require constant misting to keep the leaves from desiccating.

In this article, we will concentrate on how to propagate Michelia Champaca seeds, step by step instructions so that you have the highest rate of success for the seeds to germinate.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Germinating Michelia Champaca from Seeds to Sprouting

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

1. Allow the fruit from the parent tree to completely ripen (this usually happens at the end of autumn/beginning of summer) before harvesting its seeds. You can see it as the pods splits open, revealing the fruit (reddish in color) inside.

Fruit, you see, tends to contain chemicals that inhibit germination so the seeds don’t inadvertently take before the thing even hits the ground. If you’ve ever seen magnolia fruit, it’s essentially the same thing, as they’re directly related (in fact, in this case, the Michelia genus is readily interchangeable with the Magnolia genus).

Pick the unblemished fruit from the tree. Place the fruit in a warm, dry location until it splits open, revealing the fruits. The fruits can come in different shades ranging from pale pink, red, to almost dark brown, depending on how dry the seeds are while it is still in the pods. The black seed is inside the fruit.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below